FROM THE JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY

Long-acting beta-2 agonists achieve better asthma control when added to inhaled corticosteroids in a fixed-dose combination, compared with use of a LABA as a separate inhaler, according to Steve Turner, MD, and his associates.

At baseline, 35% of children in the FDC ICS (fixed-dose combination inhaled corticosteroids)/LABA cohort and in the separate ICS+LABA cohort had achieved overall asthma control. After 2 years, 43% of children in the FDC ICS/LABA cohort had achieved overall asthma control, compared with 37% of children in the separate ICS+LABA cohort. The adjusted odds ratio for overall asthma control in the separate ICS+LABA cohort was 0.77.

The adjusted relative risk of acute respiratory events for the separate ICS+LABA cohort was 1.21, compared with the FDC ICS/LABA cohort, and the aRR for severe exacerbations was 1.31 for the separate ICS+LABA cohort. More children in the separate ICS+LABA cohort were treated with antibiotics; however, the incidence of thrush was higher in the FDC ICS/LABA cohort.

“This small effect may be partly explained by improvement in all outcomes in both groups as the children became older. An additional factor may be that adherence was relatively poor for all participants (22%-33%), and poor adherence is associated with poor control. This may have led to the decision to step up and also to a relatively disappointing response to treatment,” the investigators wrote.

Find the full study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (doi: 10.1016/j.jaip.2016.06.009 ).

lfranki@frontlinemedcom.com

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